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GODS, MONEY, AND A FLYING SQUIRREL NAMED MOMO

our reading list for July 2015


FIVEHUNDRED PLACES POETRY
Fivehundred Places press was founded with an eye to encouraging a greater relationship between contemporary art and poetry. For years, the press sold its titles solely through galleries; Type is proud to be one of the first bookstores to stock them. Each title is dedicated to the work of a single contemporary poet, including Mary Ruefle, Dorothea Lasky, and Matthew Zapruder. 

A GOD IN RUINS by Kate Atkinson
A God in Ruins is a companion to Atkinson’s previous novel, the bestselling Life After Life. Both books feature the Todds, a British family coping with the calms and storms of the last century. The new novel tells the tale of Teddy Todd, a golden boy who goes to war and, having come home, struggles with the sense that he’s no longer a boy, no longer golden; indeed, he has the sinking feeling that there's no way to come back from war, not really.

MODERN ROMANCE by Aziz Ansari
Thanks to technology, people have more ways to meet romantic partners than at any other time in history. How do we navigate the apps and dating sites that technology has given us? How do we find love? Ansari answers all these important questions and many more, including this one: "Why did this guy just text me an emoji of a pizza?”

SCIENCE FICTION AND EXTRO-SCIENCE FICTION by Quentin Meillassoux
In this small monograph, Meillassoux, a French philosopher with a proclivity for literature, draws a distinction between two sorts of speculative fiction: science fiction and extro-science fiction, the latter being a genre that takes place beyond science, in realms where scientific principles prove impossible. The book includes a short story by Arthur C. Clarke that demonstrates Meillassoux’s ideas. 

MUNARI'S BOOKS by Giorgio Maffei
Painter, sculptor, graphic designer – was there a hat that the Italian artist Bruno Munari (1907-1998) did not wear, and wear well? Munari believed that the book was the best medium to communicate his ideas, showcase his art, and capture his creative spirit. Munari’s Books surveys his seventy-year legacy in print; each page is a testament to his talents.

THE DIVER’S CLOTHES LIE EMPTY by Vendela Vida
A woman escapes to Casablanca, where she changes identity again and again – she is Jane, then Megan, then Sabine; she dons a disguise, then dons another. What makes her run? What will make her free? The answers are elusive, though it doesn’t matter much: Vida’s novel is a meditation on identity as told in a tightly-wound, thrilling style that’s also funny – her chameleonic central character is as likely to lose her disguise as to wear it.
 
OF WALKING IN ICE by Werner Herzog
If you're feeling too hot this July, this book will cool you down. Of Walking In Ice  is a diary in which Herzog documented his wintry three-week walk from Munich to Paris to visit a friend who was ill and near death. First published in 1978, the book has slipped in and out of print a number of times in the decades since; it’s finally back in a beautiful paperback edition. 

THEATRE OF THE UNIMPRESSED by Jordan Tannahill
Is theatre dull? Jordan Tannahill doesn’t think so, and yet he hears all the time from friends and acquaintances that the medium is moribund. An award-winning playwright and director, Tannahill set out to survey the spectrum of English-language drama being produced – from the flashiest of Broadway spectacles to productions mounted in scrappy storefront theatres – and found that theatre is thriving, and that naysayers need only open their eyes – and minds.

A HISTORY OF MONEY by Alan Pauls 
From one of Latin American literature's rising stars comes this testament to the terrible power of money: the things it makes us and the things it makes us do. The novel’s narrator – whose name we don’t discover – reflects on his father’s gambling, his mother’s profligacy, and the ways that greed and consumerism deformed both his family and his country in the tumult that was Argentina in the 1970s and 1980s. 

THE FIRST COLLECTION OF CRITICISM BY A LIVING FEMALE ROCK CRITIC by Jessica Hopper
The last twenty years of American music making and music consumption are chronicled in this collection of essays and reviews. From her punk fanzine roots to her landmark piece on R. Kelly's past, The First Collection proves why the New York Times has called Hopper's work influential, and why the book has become one of the summer’s most anticipated titles at Type.

THE ODD WOMAN AND THE CITY by Vivian Gornick
Gornick’s latest is a book about many topics — sex, feminism, independence, and all the other things that a thinker thinks about while walking city streets. Told in vignettes, the book is held together by Gornick’s distinctive voice and by the themes that thread through it: that solitude is hard, that solitude is rewarding, that it’s possible to be both single and emotionally and intellectually engaged, especially in a place as diverting and thought-provoking as New York City. 

CITY BY CITY ed. Ke  ith Gessen & Stephen Squibb
Cities are constantly changing. Since the Great Recession of ’08, the speed of change in the United States seems to have accelerated — some cities are bursting with capital while some die a death. In City By City,  writers across America turn to the places where they live, and try to graph the forces — gentrification, underemployment, culture, and crime — that are changing their surroundings and themselves.

MY COUSIN MOMO by Zachariah OHora
A family of squirrels gets a visit from their cousin Momo. He's a little different — he prefers giant pink muffin-man costumes to superheroes and he plays hide and seek all wrong. At first, his family thinks he’s just too strange, but soon realizes that the differences are what make Momo so amazing. Ages 3-7

POOL by Jihyeon Lee
Two shy children meet in a very crowded public swimming pool and reality goes from pencil-lead grey to vividly-hued as they transform it into a magical underwater world. A wordless book with a strong narrative. Ages 4-8

100 GREAT CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOKS by Martin Salisbury
This hefty tome explores the relationship between children's picture books and art from the Russian Constructivists, Italian Futurists, and Postwar Neo-romantics. A collection that anyone with an interest in design, illustration, or children's literature should have.

MAD MISS MIMIC by Sarah Henstra
Historical fiction about an upperclass teen girl with a problem that all her money can't solve: a curious speech disorder causes her to stutter but also allows her to imitate other people’s voices flawlessly. Henstra stopped by to sign some copies — at our Queen Street location while supplies last! Ages 12+